Monthly Archives: July 2017

Deal With a Low Home Appraisal

In a competitive real estate market, a home being sold may enter into a multiple offer situation which could potentially raise the purchase price above the comparable sales in the area. In a situation like this, it is possible that the home appraisal for the buyer’s mortgage lender will come in lower than the purchase price. In a real estate market that favors buyers, sellers can also face a home appraisal that is lower than what they paid for the home if they bought the house at the peak of the market

Why Do Low Appraisals Happen?

Here are a few reasons why a home appraisals may come in low:

Inflated home price because of multiple offers.

Declining real estate market due to a large inventory of homes and not enough buyers.

The seller has overpriced the home.

The real estate appraiser lacks experience and doesn’t understand the influences on value.

The real estate appraiser incorrectly selected his comparable sales for his report which may have resulted in a lower home value than what should have been assessed.

Solutions for Low Appraisals

If a low home appraisal is threatening to sink your sale, purchase or refinance, stay calm, here are a couple solutions:

The buyer can pay you the difference between the purchase price you agreed upon and the appraised price in cash, you can sell the property for the appraised value and get the difference from the agreed upon higher price in a lump sum cash payment if the buyer is able to do so.

If you are the seller of the home you do have the option of lowering the selling price. If you don’t you will run the risk of every buyer running into the same problem and not being able to get a mortgage because of a low appraisal.

The seller can offer to carry a second mortgage for the difference.

If the buyer feels they absolutely have to have your home and you are not willing to lower the selling price and the buyer cannot come up with a lump sum to pay you (as mentioned in option 1) you could accept having them make payments to you over a period of time instead of the lump sum.

 

Housing Bubble Is Set to Pop

For generations, it was always a good bet to invest in a place Americans call home. Housing had almost always increased in value, and you received a multiple of whatever you invested into it in your total return.

The Truth About the Housing Bubble

There is a substantial divergence as we approach 2015. Prices have climbed about 50% since 2000 and rebounded strongly from the bottom in 2010 to 2011. But existing home sales – the amount of homes actually sold – have lagged and are up just 5% since 2000.

Median prices have topped their bubbled peaks set in 2005, but this time, the amount of homes sold is 30% less.

That means we are seeing prices set new highs as fewer buyers are in the market.

The rationale is that housing currently has a tight supply, meaning there aren’t enough homes to meet the amount of potential buyers. That may be the case to some extent. But right now, homes that are either in foreclosure, bank-owned or completely vacant are near all-time highs.

Clearly there is more going on here than just a lack of supply. The reality is that many buyers are investors, buying properties and sitting on them. This crimps supply, which helps raise prices.

Back in 2008, you could have heard the same story. The goal was to flip houses, or own a few of them to rent out. We are seeing these actions roaring back today.And if supply was so tight, buyers would simply build new homes, but those numbers are no better than the existing home sales.

There’s a big discrepancy from new homes sold versus the price these homes are fetching – and this is supply that is practically infinite as we can always build a new home.

Fed-Fueled Crash

I see one of two scenarios at play. Which one do you think will ring true?

  • Homebuyers continue to fork over more dollars to buy properties while we sit with stagnant wage growth, stagnant economic growth and low-wage jobs being about all that’s created.
  • We are on the edge of a bubble larger than the one we experienced less than a decade ago as housing prices race back down to where it is affordable and sees demand from new buyers.

The Federal Reserve is held accountable for this fiasco. If it goes forward with a rate increase in the near future, it will be us who pay the price of another bubble.In stocks, that’s homebuilders and mortgage originators. Avoid them at all costs. In your personal investments, that’s being prepared for another real estate shock.

Milton Real Estate

Whether you want compact apartments and houses for your single use or your small family, maybe you want a massive house built with wide rooms and bedrooms for your large family, or maybe you want to go for more luxurious villas… you will get well-built real estate of your choice in Milton.

Population

Milton is the fastest growing municipality according to the census conducted in 2006 and 2011. The census showed that Milton is experiencing approx. 71% rise in population from the year 2001 to 2006 and saw roughly a 56% surge in population from 2006 to 2011. The population of Milton, in 2014, is approximately 100,000, but as it is growing rapidly, its population in 2031 is forecasted to be approx. 220,000.

You will also have no problem communicating with the people in Milton as approximately 70% of the population are native English speakers, according to the census of 2011. The remaining 30% people can also communicate in English as their secondary language.

Residency and Growth

With population, the residential growth also saw a massive increase in Milton. This is also due to the successful completion of the project dubbed “the big pipe”, which was about making a piping structure which will deliver water from Lake Ontario to Milton.

By 2006, Milton had 7 new subdivisions, which included Hawthorne Village. Many new subdivisions from the list are developing, which means that there will be constant development – which is the secret of developed regions.

The council of Milton, in 2014, approved the making of more homes in Milton, which saw a surge of 25,000 residents. Moreover, there are vast numbers of home constructions at any given time in Milton, which is attracting more and more residents. In the numbers of residents, there is a fair amount of people coming from other areas of Ontario too.

Transportation

The town has an easy access to the highway 401 and 407 from Oakville and Hamilton. The town has its carriage railway lines for consignments. It has railway transportation service for passengers from Go transit and Via Rail.

If you take the highway 401, you are only 40 km far from the largest International airport (according to the passenger volume) Toronto Pearson. However, the town has a closer airport in the neighboring Burlington, the Burlington airport. The airport does provide passenger services but the services are not regular.

Buyer’s and Seller’s Markets Impact Homes for Sale

Buyer’s Market

Simply put, a buyer’s market is a result of the economic principle of supply and demand. In this case, there are more properties in supply (i.e. for sale) than there is a demand for them, meaning that those looking to invest in real estate have a lot of options to choose from. Supply and demand fluctuate depending on how many new customers enter an area and how many homeowners in the region have decided to stay in their properties.

In these circumstances, there are plentiful homes for sale, which favors those interested in investing in residential property. The geographic region and price ranges are favorable and the cost to purchase is relatively low. If housing in an area tends to take more than six months to sell, then it is considered a buyer’s market. You can easily find how many days a property has been listed on various real estate sites.

Seller’s Market

In a seller’s market, it is harder to find homes for sale. The supply is low in comparison to the demand to purchase property. Prices are typically a little higher and houses don’t tend to stay listed for as long a period of time.

When this occurs, there are a limited number of options. Buyers will have less opportunity to negotiate-because sellers can entertain other offers-and as a result, will pay more than they would in a buyer’s market. Sellers can increase their prices and, as long as the homes appraise for the asking price, receive more than they otherwise could.

What Stimulates the Change

As with everything, housing properties will fluctuate between shortage and surplus. While there is no clear determination on how long the current stage will last, there are several factors that can impact the supply and demand of homes for sale in your area. Things like interest rates, consumer confidence, and economic conditions have a high impact. A growing regional economy coupled with low-interest rates and high confidence can lead more people to buy houses.